T.T.D.T.P.C.

Crowds cram into a small courtyard. The tension is as thick as the air on a hot and humid Florida morning. Tempers flair. An uneasy balance of civility could easily slide into mass chaos at any moment.

Something is amiss, boiling points are being reached and red-faced protesters are eager to let loose their ire. A collective uproar has been corked in for far too long; no longer able to placate the suddenly boisterous masses officials scurry into damage control mode. Things could get ugly and heads will roll. It’s a very serious situation and those in charge likely had no idea what giant they were awakening when they started down the path that led us here.

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yea… we have used this image before… but if its new to you you really need to click here

The dragon has been unleashed.

We all deal with daily struggles and we each have our personal convictions so it is rare to have such a unifying outcry of passion, dismay and concern from such a divergent group spanning such a broad cross section of the public. Yet with matters this grave even the most passive souls find their convictions and confront their keepers. We are mad as hell and we are not going to take it any more…

We sat idle when we went to war, we did nothing when our taxes were hiked, and we were silent when our freedoms were stripped away but we will sit idle no more! How DARE THEY remove Figment, our beloved purple avatar representing childhood whimsy and delight from Epcot? NOW YOU HAVE GONE TOO FAR!

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Do whatever you want but do NOT mess with Figment

OK, so in the scheme of world affairs, or really in the scheme of pretty much anything else, removing a cartoon dragon from an aging theme park attraction ranks pretty low on the scale of things to be concerned with. Yet that decision made sometime in the late 90’s by potentially clueless Disney executives caused quite a stir among the Disney’s faithful. Those who live and breathe the parks and grew up with fond memories of Figment’s catchy theme song could not imagine a world without him. Petitions were signed, web sites were created and then CEO Michael Eisner was directly confronted about such matters during the open mike session of the annual stockholders meeting. Clearly Disney made a PR misstep and in a rare concession to fans added Figment back into the ride (more on that later).

Sometimes it’s the little things that mean the most. Over the years Disney fans have reacted (perhaps over reacted?) to changes made to the parks and have caused all matter of trouble for those operating them. With the creation of social media reaction to even the smallest of changes is swift and widespread. People don’t like change, especially when it revolves around beloved child-hood memories.

These uprisings tend to occur when a much loved (and often original) attraction is removed or altered for what is perceived as an inferior replacement. They also tend to be fairly recent as it is just in the last 20 years or so that the Internet has made these concerns blossom from small local outcries to worldwide fan hysteria.

Plus we admit it; Parkeology.com has been slow this summer. We should be writing more.Or we can be lazy and simply stretch a longer post out over several days.

With that said we are kicking off a series searching through the Top Ten Disney Theme Park Controversies (or T.T.D.T.P.C. if you like useless acronyms). One new entry a day for the next 2 weeks or so.

Finding an actual order is tough, at the top of the list they all created quite a stir, but lets kick things off with a seemingly great idea (if you are CEO of a fortune 500 company):

10) Mickey meet Ronald.

Back in 1997 Disney started a 10-year agreement with McDonald’s to sell the fast food giant’s offerings on property at Disney resorts and even within the parks. It seemed like a powerhouse combo with both companies dominating their respective fields and both having a longstanding family friendly image. However as with most things Disney related some fans thought differently. They did not take kindly to the idea of Ronald McDonald gallivanting around hand in hand with Mickey Mouse. No one wanted to see Grimace take up residency in Fantasyland or Mayor McCheese lord over the Magic Kingdom.

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it was mostly just stuff like this… nice wheel BTW Disney.

Ultimately the initial fan reaction was overblown. In reality McDonald’s had a fairly small presence limited mainly to one small location in each park selling McDonald’s fries and sometimes McNuggets. When Disney’s Animal Kingdom opened in 1998 McDonald’s had not only a fry location (the pun-rific Petrifires) but also a somewhat expanded menu at the largest restaurant in the park the Restaurantosaurus (they were really reaching for names back then). McDonald’s logos were not all that prominent on the food locations limited to discreet locations and small sizes. However McDonald’s also sponsored the major thrill ride at the park then named “Countdown to Extinction” later pointlessly renamed to the much more obvious “Dinosaur” (which today with it’s namesake movie long forgotten just seems idiotic). As it’s sponsor a McDonald’s logo was a prominent part of the attraction marquee for many years.

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The logo remianed small even when the name was changed

Two full menu locations were opened on property but not in the parks. One near the All-Stars resorts )featuring a hideous mash-up of McDonald’s characters along the exterior) should of raised fan concerns based on nothing more than the eyesore it caused. The other was located at Downtown Disney. Today only the All-Stars location remains and fortunately was remodeled in 2009 to become a modern and almost sleek rendition of the chain’s brand.

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This was the Down Town Disney location… the nicer of the two full service locations. Photo courtesy of yesterland.com

McDonald;s agreement ended in 2008 and they are no longer present in the parks. Today we are seeing a similar outcry as Starbuck’s continues to roll out into the parks and resorts. Again they are being done in a low-key and fairly tasteful manner and fans have grown to accept it. Of course the Disney parks have a very long history of corporate sponsors including food and beverage sponsors dating back to the very opening of Disneyland in 1955. Perhaps this was a controversy that never should have been?

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Many fans did not appreciate being invaded

With time we forget the concern and even outrage than was present at the time of this and most of the other events on our list. Nevertheless there was fear that somehow McDonald’s would cheapen the Disney image. Fans seldom like to see outside interests infiltrate the parks… something we will see again in future entries.

Click here for number nine as we continue the countdown.

In the meantime do you remember when McDonald’s invaded the Magic Kingdom?

 

 

Forget Star Wars Land. Give Me Guardians of the Galaxy.

Okay, not really. Give me both. We are only a few weeks away from the opening of the next Marvel Studios movie–a strange, weird, wonderful departure that has me remembering the giddy days of anticipating the next Star Wars or Lord of the Rings episode. Guardians sounds like a bizarre left hand turn from the tried and true super hero model that Marvel has perfected over the last decade. But already I’ve fallen in love with it.

Disney has been doing an interesting thing this summer. They’ve repurposed the Sounds Dangerous theater for 3-D previews of their summer tentpoles. First Maleficent, now Guardians of the Galaxy. On the one hand, this is a cheap, easy way to add an attraction, which looks even cheaper compared to what Universal is doing down the road. But on the other hand, each of the previews has been a generous length (10-15) minutes, the 3-D is sharp and clear, the theater is air conditioned, and there’s never a wait. At 10 minutes, Maleficent doesn’t look too bad. At 10 minutes, Guardians of the Galaxy looks like the best film of the year.

Obviously I’m speaking a little bit in hyperbole. The crazy fanboy side of me wants this to be amazing, and so far I haven’t been disappointed. As utterly ridiculous as this is, I could actually see myself going back and watching the 10 minute preview at the Studios multiple times. Let’s face it, I’ve got Muppet Vision memorized. I need new stuff. The movie is just so darn fun. It’s hard to find sci-fi that tries to be this funny, without veering into total camp. What was the last film to successfully do it? Firefly, maybe?

I do wonder if mainstream audiences will turn up. I’m fully aware that a talking tree and a homicidal raccoon seem like a weird pitch. But I hope people give it a shot I think it could really turn out to be something special. And then we’ll get that massive Guardians of the Galaxy dark ride that I’ve always wanted — at least for the last 6 months.

Starring Drew Carey

Starring Drew Carey

 

Bold New Worlds – Seven Dwarfs Mine Train

Yesterday I posted about how strange it is for frequent guests to suddenly have new experiences to enjoy. The Seven Dwarfs mountain has been isolated in the middle of New Fantasyland for what feels like a decade. We all remember when it was just a wee bump of steel in the middle of a dirt pit. And now suddenly here it is with a date to the prom and a tennis scholarship to State U.

Like the rest of New Fantasyland (except Storybook Circus), it is exceedingly pretty. And while I found the coaster to be rather disjointed, the ride is not without its moments.

The dark ride section is pretty great. It has one of those quintessential Disney moments, when Doc starts to call Heigh-Ho and the train creeps ever-so-off-kilter up the lift hill, with the music swelling, and Dwarf shadows marching beside you. That’s the kind of thing that Disney does best. It can give you goosebumps when done properly, and this moment is a bonafide goosebump moment. What Disney Magic used to mean, before the term became so watered down.

The ride is not meant to be a major E-ticket attraction, and in fact it is a little jarring to go from nicely themed kiddie-coaster to amazing dark ride to nicely themed kiddie coaster again. The lines should settle down after the initial newness wears off. In spite of some initial trepidation about the project (back when it was mostly Dumbo and princess greets), I’m a fan of New Fantasyland. I think both Seven Dwarfs and Little Mermaid are worthy additions to the Magic Kingdom. The restaurant is a much needed improvement, and though I don’t care for Story Hour with Princesses, the cottage is at least pretty and well rendered. Storybook Circus is not cream of the crop, but at least it’s an upgrade over Toontown. On the whole, this new area significantly improves the ambience of the Magic Kingdom — especially compared to the medieval tournament tents of original Fantasyland. I’m anxious to see where the Magic Kingdom goes from here.

I had the benefit of exploring these Bold New Worlds almost back to back. As strange as it sounds, I probably enjoyed the initial Harambe Theater District experience more. Harambe offered not just a surprising new set of buildings and landscaping to explore, but it gave me a different view of the old stuff — the view back towards Africa, the return of the geyser rocks, that white access bridge beyond which lies Pandora. But this new, fresh glimpse of Disney World from a different angle will soon fade, and I suspect the Seven Dwarfs Mine Train will have the staying power.

As a parkeologist, I was delighted to discover something in the Mine Train queue which I’m sure went unnoticed by practically everyone else standing in the Florida heat with me. Back in the 90s, I bought a collectible CD of the Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs Soundtrack. It contained two songs on it–scratch tracks of deleted songs from the movie. While listening to the instrumental background music in the queue, I was startled to hear renditions of both “Music in Your Soup” and “You’re Never Too Old To Be Young” mixed in with “I’m Wishing” and “Someday My Prince Will Come.” It shows a welcome attention to the history of the landmark film that inspired the ride.

The Cottage of the Seven Dwarfs